North American cold and allergy medicine industry is worth 3 billion dollars a year. So no wonder that any attempt to restrict the sale of their products is going to generate a lot of resistance.

Six years ago, the government brought forward legislation that limited the amount of cold and allergy medications sold over the counter. It was meant to curb the growing abuse that saw huge amounts of pills used to derive pseudoephedrine. The legislation did slow the trend but there was also a side effect: the sales went down. Some big companies felt a significant impact on their profits and smaller ones are struggling even today. So when government announced last week that it will be looking into strengthening the legislation again, the industry uproar was predictable.           Read more


 

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NEWS WORLD   I    LOCAL    I    POLITICS    I    ARTS    I    ENTERTAINMENT    I    SPORTS    I    CLASSIFIEDS Meth Apocalypse An indepth look into the reasons behind the recent spike in methamphetamine abuse in Canada and US by Anna Foster About      I      Subscription Services       I       Privacy Policy       I      Terms and Conditions       I      Advertising Guide      I    Change your Location    I    Other Publications ©2018     The Times Herald     Timecode Media Group      mailbox@eyecue.ca     Head Office:   1172   West   Waterfront   Street    Vancouver    BC      Canada

                                          Speed, crank, crystal - by any name, crystal meth is today the most talked about drug on the continent. But there is an untold story about meth, a story of a fierce battle over the key ingredient to the drug, which is also the key ingredient in many very profitable cold and allergy medicines - pseudoephedrine.

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